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Why Should you fertilize a tree?


Your trees and shrubs are important for so many reasons. They provide shade and beauty, offer privacy, and help keep your home cool in the summer. They also provide a habitat for birds and other animals, help clean the air and water, and can even help reduce your energy bills. But did you know that trees and shrubs also provide crucial ecological services, such as erosion control and water filtration?


Your lawn and trees are the foundation for your landscape, providing privacy, shade and beauty. Just like people, trees and shrubs need nutrients and water to stay healthy and strong. Fertilizing your trees and shrubs is one of the easiest ways to improve the look and health of your landscape. Spring is the best time to fertilize trees and shrubs, as it gives them the nutrients they need to grow strong, green leaves.


Fertilizing your trees and shrubs can help them stay healthy and grow better. The best time to fertilize is when they’re still growing, usually in the spring. When a tree is young, it needs extra nutrients to help it grow and become strong. If you don't give it the right amount and the right kind of nutrients, it won't be able to grow the way it should. This can lead to weak or dieing branches and leaves.


Fertilizing your trees can boost their performance and health, help them grow faster, and help them live longer. It can even help your trees resist pests and disease. Fertilizing your trees is a simple way to help them grow and thrive, and it's something you should definitely consider.

If you've ever cut a pine tree or a spruce tree, you know how dense and full their branches are. They're loaded with foliage, and it takes a lot of energy for them to grow and produce all that foliage. Fertilizing a tree is one of the best ways to encourage rapid growth and height increase, particularly in spruce and pine. It's also one of the best ways to improve the aesthetics of your yard, since it'll allow you to fill in bare spots on your trees or to shade large areas.